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manufacturing
To date, you have helped us divert over 48,000 wine corks from the solid waste stream. That’s over 48 cubic feet of perfectly reusable cork. Thanks!
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Great video clearly shows the harvesting process. Cork trees are first harvested when they are about 20 years old. They can be reharvested every nine years or so. In this video you’ll see workers painting a large white “9” on the trunk after the bark has been stripped. This is the year (2009) that the...
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This September, in collaboration with Cork It, we shipped 16.7 cubic feet of corks to Emily Carr University for use in their industrial design faculty’s “New Wood Materials” class. We’re hoping that all the bright young minds in ECU’s Industrial Design program will develop products and processes that allow us to reprocess our recycled corks right...
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We have sourced a Vancouver, BC tile manufacturer that has the capacity to assemble sheets of cork tiles similar to the test sample you see here. These prototype discs were manually cut with a sharp kitchen knife and glued to drywall patching mesh with a hot glue gun. They were sanded with an orbital sander...
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In my search for a suitable method to trim used wine corks into uniformly thick discs with finished surfaces, I contacted a firm with laser cutting equipment. They took a batch of natural corks and synthetic stoppers to experiment with. I had hoped the laser cutting would provide a clean surface that needed no additional...
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Calling all process engineering experts! We’re looking for cork slicing equipment that would be suitable for trimming used wine corks into consistent thickness discs similar to the ones shown in this photo. If you can recommend the best equipment or process to accomplish this — or if you operate equipment in the lower mainland area...
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Manufacturers of synthetic wine stoppers have done a great job of matching the appearance of natural cork. Great aesthetic, but this is a real problem when it comes to separating natural and synthetic corks for recycling. All 4 corks shown in the right of this photo are synthetic. You can see how good a match...
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